Wolfe Creek Crater National Park (photo credit: astro.lu.se)

Wolfe Creek Crater National Park, Halls Creek, Western Australia

The second biggest crater in the world, which sits at the center of the Wolfe Creek Crater National Park, has grown increasingly popular over the years. It is said that a giant meteorite crashed into the earth 300,000 years ago and as the energy of the impact converted into heat, it formed one of the most remarkable landmarks in Australia. Although evidence of the meteorite impact can be seen at the crater, such as fragments of iron meteorite, the next 300,000 years had gradually filled the crater with sand, deformed rocks, and shot debris. Today, the Wolfe Creek Crater rises 25 metres above the surrounding flat desert land, and the crater floor is 50-60 metres below the rim.

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Wolfe Creek Crater National Park (photo credit: astro.lu.se)

Wolfe Creek Crater National Park (photo credit: astro.lu.se)

aerial view of the national park (photo credit: bonzle.com)

Aerial view of the national park (photo credit: bonzle.com)

panoramic view of the Wolfe Creek Crater National Park (photo credit: nothinglikeaustralia.com)

Panoramic view of the Wolfe Creek Crater National Park (photo credit: nothinglikeaustralia.com)

closer look of the crater (photo credit: flickr)

Closer look of the crater (photo credit: flickr.com)

The Wolfe Creek Crater National Park is situated on the southern end of the Western Australia Kimberley region, and sits between the Great Sandy Desert and Tanami Desert of northern central Australia. Be advised that the road to the national park can be a pretty rough ride, with sharp rocks scattered around the road. The bumpy ride is all worth it once you get to see the stunning view of the flat desert plains, dotted with trees and clumps of spinifex grass. Also, the tourist facilities at the Wolfe Creek Crater National Park are limited. But you can find an information center, picnic facilities, and basic campsites with bush toilets. There’s no water available at the park so you have to bring your own. Bring additional jugs to avoid dehydration as it can get pretty humid and hot at the park.

Wolfe Creek Meteorite Crater (photo credit: John Goldsmith)

Wolfe Creek Meteorite Crater (photo credit: John Goldsmith)

the national park at dawn (photo credit: Benjamin Jakabek)

The national park at dawn (photo credit: Benjamin Jakabek)

flocks of cockatoos at the crater (photo credit: Benjamin Jakabek)

Flocks of cockatoos at the crater (photo credit: Benjamin Jakabek)

the vast grasslands at the park (photo credit:  flickriver.com)

The vast grasslands at the park (photo credit: flickriver.com)

The Wolfe Creek Crater National Park is the perfect place to go exploring and bushwalking. Aside from the fascinating crater, you can also take in the mezmerizing scenery, which is composed of reasonably large trees, a variety of wildlife, flowering shrubs, and the grasslands and flat lands that almost seem endless.

- Anna Mae Escobin